What Are the Requirements to Get On Suboxone?

If you or a loved one have an addiction to opioids and looking to medically detox, knowing the requirements to get on Suboxone is helpful.

Suboxone is a prescription medication that is used and prescribed to treat people who are addicted to opioids. This includes both prescription and illegal opioid drugs. It is made up of two main ingredients called naloxone and buprenorphine. Buprenorphine is a partial opioid agonist, and it blocks the opioid receptors in the brain and helps to reduce a person’s urges. Naloxone, the second ingredient, reverses the effects of opioids already present in the body. 

How Does a Suboxone Work?

This medication works to prevent any withdrawal symptoms and block the user from using other opioid medications when they work together. This helps those addicted to staying off of drugs. Suboxone can be used at many different stages during addiction treatment and offers a long-term resolution for managing opioid addiction.

What Are the Requirements to Get On Suboxone

What are the Requirements of Suboxone?

Those who want to give Suboxone a try to treat their opioid/opiate addiction should know beforehand the guidelines for determining whether a person is suited for this kind of therapy. 

The primary focus for deciding whether or not someone should be put on Suboxone is whether they are committed to treatment for their opioid addiction. The kind of treatment a person chooses is up to them, but if they are not open to the idea of being sober and recovering, it will not work for them. We all know there is always a reluctance to give up opioids, but the amount of willingness is important. 

More About of Suboxone Requirements

The person also needs to be able to follow through with the doctor’s scheduled visits. Visits will likely be daily for a while, then go down to weekly. You will not be able to step into treatment and not follow through with the doctor prescribing Suboxone to you. 

The absolute more important thing a person will need to know before going on Suboxone is that you should not be using any alcohol, opioids, or benzodiazepines while taking it. When those substances are combined with Suboxone, it can severely depress your central nervous system and become lethally dangerous. 

Maximizing What You Get From Suboxone

Let’s keep this very honest. Suboxone is not a magical drug that will just fix you when you start taking it. But the good news is that you can get the most out of your time on Suboxone so you can avoid turning back to the drugs that took over your life but combining it with therapy or counseling. It helps you by giving you the knowledge and skills you need to live a long-term life free from opioid addiction. While it may be required when on Suboxone, it is proven to work better than without having any therapeutic intervention.

Suboxone plays its part by treating the physical symptoms of your addiction, but therapy is there to treat the mental symptoms of addiction. By doing therapy, you will explore what your triggers are and how to fight them. You will also be able to learn about your emotions and why you feel them.

The Danger Symptoms of Suboxone

Once treatment has begun, you should be on the lookout for any negative reactions to Suboxone. This can include flu-like symptoms, sweating, vomiting, stomach pains, low energy, and headaches. If this occurs, you will want to talk to your doctor about potentially changing your dosage.

Overcome Opioid Abuse at On Call Treatment

While Suboxone is a helpful tool to manage opioid addiction, it is also important to hear that it can also lead to dependence. The most likely to develop dependence are people with a current or past problem with drug abuse, unaware of the dangerous side effects, and those addicted to heroin and looking for a way to avoid withdrawal.

If you think Suboxone could benefit you even after knowing the requirements, reach out to a doctor. You could be taking a life-changing step to getting your health and life back on track.