Staying in Recovery as an LGBTQ Person

Being a part of the LGBTQ community along with the addiction recovery community can be very challenging and often leads to higher relapse rates because of the stigma attached.

Being a part of the LGBTQ community as well as being a part of the recovery community can be very challenging. Even twice as challenging considering you have to deal with not only the stigma attached with being an LGBTQ person but also the stigma attached with being a recovering drug addict or alcoholic. They can both be scary places to be in. Many people in the LGBTQ community often use drugs and alcohol as a way to self-medicate and cope with the hardships they have to face every single day.

Information on LGBT Identity and Substance Abuse

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention documented that many different studies show those people in the LGBTQ community have a higher rate of substance abuse than those in the hetero community. They often use substances as a way to cope with homophobia, discrimination, victimization, and violence towards them because of their sexual orientation. 

When you take the important and life-changing steps to face your addiction, it doesn’t just end after detox and a rehabilitation treatment program. Staying sober and in recovery is a lifelong decision and many steps should be taken after you leave treatment to remain successful. Being an LGBTQ person, this can be scary if you don’t know what options you have. Not only are there treatment programs that are specifically catered to LGBTQ people, but you would be surprised at the amount of safety, support, and inclusivity you can find in recovery after you leave treatment as well.

Staying in Recovery as an LGBTQ Person

Staying in LGBT Addiction Recovery

A huge barrier that many LGBTQ people face is finding a sober living home that meets their specific needs and accepts their lifestyle choices. This can feel like a huge roadblock to staying in recovery. When I chose to stay in recovery and reside in sober living, I found that a large number of people I shared a home with were LGBTQ people. No one was ever excluded or felt out of place. After all, we were all there for one reason that bonded us all together; to get sober and stay sober.

We all respected each other and made one another feel safe because we all wanted to see each other succeed. Everyone in my sober home came from different backgrounds, but it didn’t matter. We all wanted a better life for ourselves. If you do still have your reservations about this kind of sober living home, there are sober living homes out there that are designed specifically with the LGBTQ community in mind where you can be surrounded by other people who have experienced the same trouble you have being an LGBTQ person. Everyone deserves to be heard and understood and there is a place for you.

More About Getting Sober As an LGBT Individual

Another roadblock that many LGBTQ people may struggle with when staying in recovery is finding a 12-step program, or recovery program, where they feel comfortable. 12 step programs, where you will spend most of your recovery journey throughout life, are designed to be all-inclusive. They are meant for every kind of person, no matter their sexual orientation, to find a support system in their sobriety.

Most of the 12-step meetings I have attended have had people from every sexual orientation attend. They felt comfortable enough to share their story with the rest of us. If you still don’t feel fully comfortable sharing what you have been through in life as an LGBTQ person, there are LGBTQ-only meetings in every 12-step program.

On Call Treatment Does NOT Discriminate

Recovery is all-inclusive because every person deserves to have the chance to better their lives and remain sober. If you want a life in the beautiful world of recovery, there will always be a place for you. Don’t let the fear of not fitting in hold you back from seeing what your life can be like in recovery. On Call Treatment is here to help anyone who is suffering from drug and alcohol addiction, regardless of their sexual preference or orientation. Our facility is always a judgment-free zone where everyone can feel safe and cared for at every level of clinical care.